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The Young Women’s Leadership School, Harlem

ANDREW HIGGINBOTHAM, PRINCIPAL
Total Students: 472
Grades: 6-12

The Young Women’s Leadership School (TYWLS) was established to nurture the curiosity and creativity of young women and to address their developmental needs. We cultivate dynamic, participatory learning, enabling students to experience success at many levels, especially in the fields of math, science and technology. Students are encouraged to achieve their personal best in and out of the classroom, and all students are expected to continue their education in the pursuit of a college degree. TYWLS works with families and instills in the student a sense of community, responsibility and ethical principles of behavior—characteristics that will help make them leaders of their generation.

2 cool things about TYWLS, Harlem

  • When it opened in 1996, TYWLS of East Harlem was the first, public, single-sex school to open in the U.S. in over thirty years. Today there are over 500. TYWLS has sister schools in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.
  • TYWLS believes that student learning occurs both in and outside of the classroom. Our students have many opportunities to participate in internships, scientific fieldwork and summer college programs.

2 things you should know about coming here

  • This school has a required uniform.
  • There is a community service requirement of 120 hours.

How to get in

This school is open only to female students. Priority is given to continuing 8th graders; then to District 4 students or residents; then to NYC residents. Please contact the school in October for Open House information.


TYWLS Harlem is a host school for the New Visions-Queens College Urban Teacher Residency.

They're realistic, and prepare you for the kind of work to expect in college. The teachers show you options. And if you underestimate yourself, they push you to go further.

– Destiny, '12

At TYWLS, students do not let their sisters fail, it is cool to be smart and hardworking, and young women believe anything is possible.

– Berenice, '11